Revolutionary America (1764-1783)

This page was last updated November 19, 2017.

A chronological listing of historical and family related events during the Revolutionary America (1764-1783) period.

Please feel invited to leave comments by Writing Home if you see errors or know of a missing event entry that should be included and use citations whenever possible.

Graphic Conventions:

  • Important or interesting historical events are included and highlighted in GREEN to assist the reader in establishing a context between the indexed events and our country’s history;
  • Persons of interest to the family are highlighted in RED to draw the reader’s attention and facilitate visual scanning of the page;
  • Information based upon oral tradition and oral lore is highlighted in YELLOW.  Yellow is the color of caution and was used here by no mistake!

See our COLONIAL RECORDS page for events that transpired prior to 1764.

Go to YOUNG REPUBLIC for the period beginning 1784.


1764

SUGAR ACT and CURRENCY ACT.


1764

By tradition, Thomas Aaron Caudill was born in Lunenburg Co., Virginia.


RECORD 1764-A

March 29, 1764

(LOV ~ REEL #4) LOV – Lunenburg County, VA: Deed Book, 9, 1763 – 1764, Unpaged index, 483 p., pp. 436-9.
George Musick of Alleyfax (Halifax Co) to James Gallemore of Lunenburg Co., Va, 50 lbs, 100 acres, Lunenburg Co., Fork of Crooked Run adjoining John Ussrey, Isaac Medley, James Gallimore, Aagay Sims, Edward Waller, Henry Moore.
wit: NATHA LAFFOON, William Gallemore.
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


RECORD 1764-B

April 7, 1764

(LOV ~ REEL #4) LOV – Lunenburg County, VA: Deed Book, 9, 1763 – 1764, Unpaged index, 483 p., pp. 439 – 444.
William Gallemore to George Stiles, 50 lbs, 100 acres, Great Creek adjoining William Gallimore and NATHANIEL LAFFOON.
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


RECORD 1764-C

April 12, 1764

(LOV ~ REEL #29) LOV – Brunswick County, VA: Order Book, No. 9, 1763 – 1764, Unpaged index, 345 p., p. 328.
On petition of Benjamin Strange, NATHANIEL LAFFOON appointed Constable in room of Strange.”
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


RECORD 1764-D

May 14, 1764

(LOV ~ REEL #29) LOV – Brunswick County, VA: Order Book, No. 10, 1764 – 1765, Unpaged index, 232 p., p. 46.
Isaac Brown vs NATHANIEL LAFFOON, DEFT. (Nature of suit not stated). “On hearing the Parties, it is ordered petitioner pay unto defendent his costs.”

NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


RECORD 1764-E

June 10, 1764

Lunenburg Co., Va. Cumberland Parish Vestry Book 10.  Tax List by David Garland.
NATHANIEL LAFFOON, Constable 0 tithes 250 acres (Constables were not tithed)
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


1765

By tradition, William ‘Old William of Wilkes’ Caudill was born in Lunenburg Co., Virginia.


1765-1771

Bassett, John S. The Regulators of North Carolina (1765-1771). American Historical Association, Annual Report of the American Historical Association for 1894, (pp. 141-212).  North Carolina Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

NORTH CAROLINA WAR OF REGULATION

The War of the Regulation, (a.k.a. the Regulator Movement), began in about 1765 as colonists grew increasingly intolerant and dissatisfied with appointed colonial officials.  “The grievances of the Regulators were excessive taxes, dishonest sheriffs, and extortionate fees.”(1)Bassett, John S. The Regulators of North Carolina (1765-1771), p.150  The Regulation culminated in May 16, 1771 with the battle of Alamance.

The Regulators were a group of colonists that banded together in direct opposition to taxation and fees being imposed by the colonial officials.  While it has been suggested in the past that the Regulation Movement was a catalyst event leading to the American Revolution, it is more accurately portrayed as an uprising.

NARRATIVE:

(1) “…has discovered in the Regulation a worthy struggle for liberty.”(2)Ibid. p.141

(2) “…two new points in regard to the Regulation may now be taken as historical truth. (1) The Regulation was not attempted as a revolution. It was rather a peasants’ rising, a popular upheaval. This is a chief new point which, it seems, a study of the records should reveal. A revolution involves a change of the form or principles of government. It is constitutional in its significance. A peasants’ rising aims at a change of agents who administer, or of the manner of administering-, affairs under principles or forms that remain intact. It is a matter of party, chiefly. A revolution may embrace a popular rising, and a popular rising may run into, or in a manner partake of the nature of, a revolution; but we may always find the general difference just mentioned. Could it have had any other fate than it did have, the Regulation might possibly have run into a revolution ; but at the time when it was crushed it had not reached that stage. (2) Another fact that the records emphasize is this: The Regulation was not a religious movement. It was rather of an economic and political nature.”(3)Ibid. p.142

(3) “THE BACK COUNTIES. The topography of North Carolina reveals on the east a broad alluvial plain. This is intersected by numerous rivers, along whose banks lies much rich low ground. West of this section is a broken region of red clay soil thickly netted by small streams, which makes the head waters of the larger rivers of the plain. Farther west are high, mountain-studded plateaus, which modern railroad facilities are showing to be perhaps the grandest scenery on our eastern Atlantic Slope. It was in the second of these divisions that the Regulation had its home. At the time of which we write this region was usually known as “the back counties” or “the back country.” It is hilly upland, and its fertile soil is well suited to the growth of grains, grass, and fruit. At the middle of the eighteenth century it was covered by large forests of oak and hickory, broken here and there by open prairie-like tracts of good grass. To a passing observer the country is much like that of eastern Pennsylvania or central Maryland. Indeed, it is part of a continuous geological formation which lies just east of the Appalachian foothills and extends in a southwest direction from Pennsylvania to northern Georgia.”(4)Ibid. p.144

(4) “Along the lower western valleys of the Yadkin a counter current from the South was met. The home seekers scattered themselves around in all directions, carefully picking out the best land. They moved to the west till they reached the mountains. A few hunters ventured across and found wide, sloping stretches of luscious grass. With alacrity the mountain gates were thrown open and the conquering host marched through. It was the beginning of “the winning of the West. When viewed in its entirety the whole involvement seems a romance.”(5)Ibid. p.145

(5) “It was shortly before 1740 that this tide reached North Carolina. Coming down from Virginia, it ran along the head waters of the Yadkin, Haw, Neuse, Tar, Catawba, and Deep rivers, until the whole country from what is now the vicinity of Raleigh on the east to the neighborhood of Morganton on the west was taken up. So rapid was the movement that Governor Tryon reports that in the summer and winter of 1765 more than 1,000 immigrants’ wagons passed through Salisbury, most of which were bound for parts of North Carolina.”(6)Ibid. p.145

(6) “The eastern plain had been the first part of the colony to be settled. Convenience of transportation and the desire for fertile river shores operated to group the earliest settlers along the water courses. In the extreme east streams were so numerous that the whole country was practically on water routes. This region was soon settled. Conditions here were favorable to slave labor,’ and by the end of a century’s growth the coast region was fairly fall of fine estates and wealthy families. Although there were many of the middle class settled around them, these older families were the influential factors in the State and in society. Old settlers, with traditions of their own, and connected chiefly with the State religion, they had no sympathy for the new men of the hills. There was also a natural barrier between the two sections. This was a sparsely settled region of pine forest, stretching monotonously from the valley of the Roanoke on the north to that of the Cape Fear on the south. It was so far from the coast that it was traversed by few rivers, and those were hardly navigable. It contained but little ‘bottom’ land and had to wait for the day of railroads and cotton cultivation before it was developed. Cut off thus from the men of the east, the men of the “back counties” felt no more sympathy for the former than they received from them.”(7)Ibid. p.146

(7) “The life of the people was that of the pioneer. The necessaries of subsistence were plentiful, but luxuries were few. Some old men who had been Regulators told Caruthers that about the time of the Regulation there was not a plank floor, a feather bed, a riding carriage, or a side saddle within the bounds of their acquaintance.”(8)Ibid. p.147

(8) “The political institutions were not of a nature to suit a people like these. The constitution left them a very small share in government. The exercise of the executive, the judicial, and, to a large extent, the legislative functions was in the hands of the central royal officeholders. The governor was appointed by the King, and represented the royal prerogative. With the council, he was the chief executive agent. The councilors were appointed by the Crown, usually on the recommendation of the governor, and they could be relied on to take the side of the prerogative. The chief justice was regularly named by the Crown. The governor in council appointed the county justices and the chief justice, temporarily, when there was a vacancy, and the two associates. Out of council he appointed the officers of the militia, and selected the sheriff from three freeholders whose names had been submitted by the county court. He must also approve a bill before it became a law, and he was commander of the militia. It was thus that his influence was paramount. Not being paid by the people’s assembly, he was not afraid of it.”(9)Ibid. p.148

(9) “The result of all this was that in each county there were a certain number of men who were likely to have in control all the offices. This is suggestive of what we today are accustomed to call ‘court-house rings’. The disadvantage was that the continued effectiveness of government depended too much on the personal honesty of these officeholders. In many of the eastern counties this state of affairs seems to have worked well. But in the remote sections there is much evidence that the officers were selfish and mercenary, and that they were mutually leagued together to forward their own selfish ends. It was to try to clean out this Augean stable that Regulation had its existence.”(10)Ibid. p.149

(10) “The grievances of the Regulators were excessive taxes, dishonest sheriffs, and extortionate fees.’ Each of these was made more intense by the scarcity of money. The stamp-act trouble does not seem to have had any immediate influence on this movement. That the people of the back country sympathized with the Sons of Liberty and could have been aroused to help them had the discontent spread from the Cape Fear inward is undoubtedly true, but this whole movement passed over before the Regulation came into existence.”(11)Ibid. p.150

(11) “Another very prominent grievance was the dishonesty of the sheriffs, who failed to pay into the hands of the pubic treasury the money they had collected.”(12)Ibid. p.152

(12) “Extortionate fees was perhaps the greatest grievance of all.”(13)Ibid. p.153

RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


March 22, 1765

THE STAMP ACT


March 24, 1765

THE QUARTERING ACT OF 1765


May 29, 1765

PATRICK HENRY’s “If this be treason, make the most of it!” speech.


May 30, 1765

VIRGINIA STAMP ACT RESOLUTIONS


October 7-25, 1765

STAMP ACT CONGRESS

NARRATIVE:

(1) First Congress of the American colonies.  Organized in response to the King’s Stamp Act of 1765. 
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


RECORD 1765-A

October 14, 1765

(LOV ~ REEL #29) LOV – Brunswick County, VA: Order Book, No. 11, 1765 – 1766, Unpaged index, 190 fo., pp. 163.
NATHANIEL LAFFOON is appointed surveyor of the road from Flat Rock Bridge to Brunswick Co. line.
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


1766

By tradition, Matthew Caudill was born in Lunenburg Co., Virginia.


RECORD 1767-A

July 27, 1767

There is a sale of land in Brunswick Co., VA from JOHN CAUDLE and ANN his wife, of St. Andrews Parish, 100 acres in Brunswick, consideration of 40 lbs, to Thomas Ball, Jr., 27 July 1767 Recorded 27 July 1767.
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:

Need to attain copy of the document.
DOCUMENT:


RECORD 1767-B

September 10, 1767

Library of Virginia – Land Office Patents. No. 37, 1767-1768, pp. 69-70. (Reel #37).
To John Caudle, patent for 62 acs. of land in Brunswick Co., located on the meander of Shining Creek. Mouth of a Branch on Shining Creek, up the Branch, to Stith’s Line, Ingrams’s corner, Owen Strange’s corner.
NARRATIVE:
(1) ‘Stith’ is likely a reference to John Stith.  See grant of June 16, 1756, 1,078 acres N side of Shining Creek.
(2) In 1777, John Stith appears as Lieutenant in the Virginia 4th Regiment with William Caudle, Private.
RESEARCH NOTE:
(1) See John Ingram Grantee March 1, 1773.  Calls are similar, may be property adjacent to this parcel.
DOCUMENT:


1767-1771

(LOV ~ REEL #5) LOV – Lunenburg County, VA:  Deed Book, 11, 1767 – 1771, Unpaged index, 450 p., p. 81
MATTHEW LAFFOON from JAMES GALLEMORE.
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


RECORD 1768-A

July 20, 1768

Granville Co. N.C., List of Taxes in Nap of Reed District, July 20th 1768 [Charles Partee Constable]:
Granville Co., N.C., Tax Lists, CR044.701, State of North Carolina Library and Archives, Raleigh, NC. John Corder
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


RECORD 1769-A

February 15, 1769

Granville Co., NC Deed Book J, Page 146.
James Caudle of Granville Co., N.C., sells Isom Caudle of same 100 acs. on Tar River adjoining Jones.
Witnesses: James Willis, Littleton Mapp.
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


RECORD 1770-A

May 12, 1770

(LOV ~ REEL #5) LOV – Lunenburg County, VA: Probably Deed Book, 11, 1767 – 1771, Unpaged index, 450 p
Patent 400 acres George the Second Richard Dennis VPB 39:16 typ patent ref VPB 39:16 to Richard Dennison 40Shre 400a Lunenburg/ both sides of Flat Rock Road loc 56082 -56626 F127 L0 P255pt A) at Mason’s corner bj on sd Rdln S; 100P; Masonpt B) roln E; 210P;pt C) wo in Dix’s Line ln N8W; 150P; Dixpt D) roln E; 134P;pt E) wo on the sd Rd ln S62E; 67P; from Flat Rock Road pt F) Caudles and Laffoon’s corner ptrs in the same,ln N40W; 308P; Caudle & Laffoon pt G) Williams’s corner wo in the same ln S55W; 100P; Williams pt H) bjln S10W; 62P;pt I) pln S30W; 134P;pt J) 3plc S17W; 16P;end
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


RECORD 1771-A

1771

Granville Co., N.C., Petition from Granville Co., N.C., Inhabitants Concerning Church Buildings, James Caudill, Isom Caudill.
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


May 16, 1771

Battle of Alamance

The battle occurred near Great Alamance Creek, in Alamance Co., NC (formerly part of Orange Co.).  At that place on May 16, 1771, the Provincial Militia of North Carolina, led by Royal Governor Tyron, confronted the North Carolina Regulators in what was to be the final (and only) battle of the War of the Regulation.

“In the spring of 1771, Royal Governor William Tryon left New Bern, mustering and marching approximately 1,000 militia troops west to address a rebellion that had been brewing in western counties for several years, but which had included only minor, scattered acts of violence, followed by refusals to pay fees, disruptions of court proceedings, and continued harassment of government officials. About 2,000 so-called “regulators” had gathered, hoping to gain concessions from the Governor by intimidating him with a show of superior force. Funded by council member and wealthy merchant Samuel Cornell for £6,000,on May 11, Tryon left the county seat of Hillsborough with his militia to confront the Regulators, who had made camp south of Great Alamance Creek in western Orange County (present-day Alamance County).”((“Alamance Battleground: Overview”))

While the Regulators were 2,000 strong in number, the Provincial Militia forces were far more organized and well armed resulting in a decisive victory for Tyron and the colonial government.  The number of losses on each side varied widely in the reporting.  After the battle, Tryon took 13 men prisoner.  Seven of those men were later executed in Hillsborough and yet others were pardoned by the Royal Governor in exchange for their oath of allegiance to the royal government.  Many Regulators subsequently departed to the west and south to frontier areas beyond North Carolina.

NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


RECORD 1771-B

November 3, 1771

Vestry Book of St. Andrews Parish, Brunswick Co., VA,
3 Nov 1771 to Sarah Caudle, for her maintenance the present year…..500 tobo
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


RECORD 1772-A

March 13, 1772

(LOV ~ REEL #30) LOV – Lunenburg County, VA: Order Book, No. 13, 1769 – 1777, Unpaged index, 501 p., p. 183.
NATHANIEL LAFFOON, pltf vs John Matthis Jr., Defendant. In case. Case dismissed (nature of case not stated).
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


RECORD 1772-B

March 1772

Lunenburg Co., Va. Cumberland Parish Vestry Book 14.
Returns of processioning of Land by Edward Ragsdale and NATHANIEL LAFFOON Precinct No. 25 Landowner: NATHANIEL LAFFOON present: Daniel Apperson, James Thompson, John Matthews, Jr.
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


RECORD 1772-C

March 18, 1772

Journals of the House of Burgesses in Virginia, p. 252.
Petition of Henry Blagrave complaining of an undue Election and Return of Mr. Thomas Pettus to serve as a burgess….for the county of Lunenburg…and add to the votes of NATHANIEL LAFFOON and Hugh Wallace who appear to have voted for the Petitioner, but their names not entered upon the poll….therefore, it is the opinion of this Committee that Mr. Henry Blagrave is duly elected to serve as Burgess.”
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
(1) In 1703, seventy years prior, a certain Thomas Pettis owns land next to James Caudle.
DOCUMENT:


RECORD 1772-D

August 1772

(LOV ~ REEL #5) LOV – Lunenburg County, VA: Deed Book, 12, 1771 – 1777, Unpaged index, 542 p., pp. 152-3
Thomas Harding of Lunenburg Co., VA to Nathaniel Laffoon JR of Lunenburg Co., VA, 100 acres on Great Creek along Daniel Epperson’s line, along WILLIAM GALLIMORE’s line.
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


RECORD 1772-E

1772

Lunenburg Co Cumberland parish Vestry Book 1772.  Tax List by John Ragsdale.
Nathaniel Laffoon, (1 TITHE), Nathaniel Laffoon, Jr., (1 tithe).
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


1773

By tradition, Abner Caudill was born in Lunenburg Co., Virginia.


RECORD 1773-A

March 1, 1773

Library of Virginia – Land Office Patents. No. 41, 1772-1773, p.283. (Reel #40).
John Ingram grantee 73 acs. in Brunswick Co. adjoining the land of Lightfoot, Stith, Demrol and others.
NARRATIVE:
(1) Seemingly adjacent to John Caudle’s grant of September 10, 1767.
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


RECORD 1773-B

September 15, 1773

(LOV ~ REEL #5) LOV – Lunenburg County, VA: Probably Book #12.
WILLIAM AND MARY GALLIMORE of Lunenburg Co., VA to Nathaniel Laffoon, 100 lbs, 50 acres, Great Creek, bounded by James Thompson, George Styles, LAFFOON, and a Branch.
Wit:Joseph Turner, Matthew Laffoon, Thomas Taylor.
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


RECORD 1773-C

October 26, 1773

(LOV ~ REEL #5) LOV – Lunenburg County, VA: Deed Book, 12, 1771 – 1777, Unpaged index, 542 p., p. 378.
Nathaniel Laffoon to Benjamin Taylor, 100 lbs, 150 acres, halfway Branch by Fredk Pettipool, James Waller and a branch.
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


RECORD 1774-A

1774

Lunenburg Co., Va., Cumberland parish Tax List.
Nathaniel Laffoon, Sr., (1 Tithe), Nathaniel Laffoon, Jr., (1 tithe).
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


April 19, 1775

THE ‘SHOT HEARD ROUND THE WORLD’.


June 15, 1775

GEORGE WASHINGTON NAMED COMMANDER IN CHIEF.


RECORD 1775-A

November 1775

Absalom Caudle joined the Revolutionary Army of North Carolina, 10th Regiment, at Cross Creek, now Fayetteville, NC.
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


1775-1779

The American Revolution brought much change to Virginia, including a new state government. Because of the upheaval, no land grants were made between 1775 and 1779, when an act establishing the Land Office was passed.


July 4, 1776

DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE.


Record 1776-A

September 1, 1776

Revolutionary War Rolls 1775-1783.  National Archives. Muster Roll of Captain Samuel Hopkins’ Co., 6th Virginia RegimentSeptember 1, 1776 through May 31st, 1777.
#6 …. John Caudle … Present
#26 .. John Cordill, Deserted in Virginia.
NARRATIVE:
(1) Organized February 1776 at Williamsburg from Pittsylvania, Amherst, Buckingham, Charles City, Lunenburg, New Kent, Mecklenburg, Dinnwiddie, Prince George, and Spotsylvania Counties. Entered Valley Forge with 237 assigned, 82 fit for duty. Left Valley Forge with 88 assigned, 47 fit for duty. Previous Engagements: Chesapeake Bay, Northern New Jersey, Trenton-Princeton, Defense of Philadelphia, Philadelphia-Monmouth.
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT: Muster Roll Image


RECORD 1776-B

December 1776

Absalom Caudle was first discharged in December 1776.
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


1777

LUNENBURG COUNTY VIRGINIA:  Part of Charlotte County was added.


RECORD 1777-A

January 1, 1777

Southern Campaigns Revolutionary War Pension Statements & Rosters. http://www.revwarapps.org/
“I Do Hereby certify that the Bearer hereof John Cordell acted as a chaplin to the 11th Virg’a. Reg’t under my command from the 1 st Day of Jan’y. 1777 untill after the Battle of Brandewine when he was captured by the Enemy & Remain’d a prisoner of war till the Beginning of the year 1779 …”  Daniel Morgan, Late Brigad’r Gen’l.
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


RECORD 1777-B

April through August, 1777

Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783; National Archives, Washington. D.C.

Muster Rolls of Captain James Lucas’ Co., 4th Virginia Regiment.  William Caudle
April through August, 1777

Colonel Thomas Elliot, Middle Brook Camp; Sterling Clack, Sargeant; John Stith Lieutenant, March 9, 1776
#10 .. Private William Caudle, “Sick at Morristown”

NARRATIVE:

(1)”The Middlebrook encampment was a seasonal encampment of the Continental Army during the American War for Independence near Middle Brook in Bridgewater Township, New Jersey (between Martinsville and Bound Brook) in 1777 and again in 1778–79.” {https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Middlebrook_encampment}.

(2) The annotation “Sick at Morristown” is a reference to Morristown, NJ located about twelve miles west on New York City.  “In 1777, General George Washington and the Continental Army marched from the victories at Trenton and Princeton to encamp near Morristown from January to May. Washington had his headquarters during that first encampment at Jacob Arnold’s Tavern located at the Morristown Green in the center of the town.” {https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morristown,_New_Jersey#Eighteenth_century}.

(3) “The 4th Virginia Regiment was raised on December 28, 1775, at Suffolk Court House, Virginia, for service with the Continental Army. The regiment saw action at the Battle of Trenton, Battle of Princeton, Battle of Brandywine, Battle of Germantown, Battle of Monmouth and the Siege of Charleston. Most of the regiment was captured at Charlestown, South Carolina, on May 12, 1780, by the British and the regiment was formally disbanded on January 1, 1783.” {https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/4th_Virginia_Regiment}.

(4) Pension Application of James Lucas W12163 Mary Lucas VA Transcribed and annotated by C. Leon Harris. The pension application of James Lucas attests that he served during the entirety of the Revolution, mostly in the brigade of General Charles Scott, and that his residence during the whole time was in Brunswick Co., VA. {http://revwarapps.org/w12163.pdf}

RESEARCH NOTE:

(1) If we assume William Caudle was at least twenty years of age at this time, then he was born prior to 1757.  If we further deduce that his father was at least twenty-five years of age at the time of his birth, then we’re trying to locate a male Caudle born about or before 1732.  The Virginia 4th was organized in the winter of 1775 and was formed in February of 1776.  The men were from the southeastern counties of Virginia to include Brunswick and Surry.  “Organized February 1776 at Suffolk Courthouse from Berkley, Charlotte, Prince Edward, Sussex, Southampton, Nansemouth, Brunswick, Isle Of Wright, Surry, and Princess Anne Counties and Boro of Norfolk.” {http://www.revolutionarywar101.com/american-units/va-04/}.

DOCUMENT:

Muster Roll, VA 4th Regiment, April 1777;

Muster Roll, VA 4th Regiment, May 1777;

Muster Roll, VA 4th Regiment, June 10, 1777; 

Muster Roll, VA 4th Regiment, July 1777;

Muster Roll, VA 4th Regiment, August 6, 1777;


RECORD 1777-C

June-July 1777

Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783; National Archives, Washington. D.C.

Muster Rolls of Captain Samuel Hopkins’ Co., 6th Virginia Regiment. John Caudle
June 1777 through July 1777.

#25 .. John Caudle, Deserted in Virginia.

NARRATIVE:
(1) “The 6th Regiment was formed in February 1776 at Williamsburg. Companies recruited men from Pittsylvania, Amherst, Buckingham, Charles City, Lunenburg, New Kent, Mecklenburg, Dinwiddie, Prince George, and Spotsylvania Counties. Field officers at Valley Forge were Colonel John Gibson, Lt. Colonel Charles Simms and Major Samuel Hopkins.” {https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/6th_Virginia_Regiment_(Revolutionary_War)}

RESEARCH NOTE:

DOCUMENT:

Muster Roll, VA 6th Regiment, May 1777;

Muster Roll, VA 6th Regiment, June 1777;


RECORD 1777-D

August 15, 1777

Granville Co., NC., Deed Book L, p.187.
Isham Cordill to Thomas Bradford, both of Granville Co., N.C., 100 acres on south side of Tar River adjoining Jones land. Same land as in the above deed. Isham’s wife Elizabeth also takes part in the sale.
Witnesses: Thomas Veasos (?), William Burford, and Robert Allison.
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


Abt. 1779

By tradition, Jeremiah Caudill was born.


1780

Library of Virginia.

“In 1780 the Virginia General Assembly replaced the Anglican vestries and churchwardens of the colonial period with elected bodies called Overseers of the Poor. The Overseers provided food, clothing, shelter, and medical treatment for the persons who were too poor to support themselves or too ill to provide for their basic needs. They also bound out children whose parents could not support them or who failed to educate or instruct them, as well as orphans to become apprentices. The boys learned a trade and the girls learned domestic skills.”


RECORD 1780-A

July 1780

Absalom Caudill became a substitute for John Elwell of Bladen Co., NC, served three months and was discharged in July 1780.
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


RECORD 1780-B

July 24, 1780

Brunswick County, VA – William Caudle named as a lieutenant in militia.
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


RECORD 1780-C

Bef. August 16, 1780

The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration. James Cordill Pension Application, File S-30344.
The Battle of Camden occurred on August 16, 1780.
James Cordill:
First Tour: (p.4), “… that he entered the service of the United States shortly before Gen’l Gates defeat at Camden SC as a volunteer for three months in Wilkes County North Carolina where he lived in Capt. John Morgan’s Company”.  He was discharged, “… at the mouth of Rocky River in Wilkes County N.C. by Col. Noah…”.  Mathematically, his three month enlistment ended in mid-November 1780.
Second Tour: “… sometime before the Battle of King’s Mountain he again volunteered for three months …”.  The Battle of King’s Mountain occurred October 7, 1780.  Seemingly, his enlistments overlap or they were perhaps back-to-back. Mathematically, his second tour of three month enlistment ended sometime around the end of December 1780.
(p.5), “He was born in Lunenburg County Va”.
(p.5), Stephen Cordill … is the brother of the above James Cordill …”.
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:

MAPS & DOCUMENTS:
Pension Application Images: Seventeen pages total. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17.
By calculation, James was twenty-seven years of age at his time of service.


RECORD 1780-D

Bef. August 16, 1780

The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration. Stephen Cordill Pension Application, File R-2315.
The Battle of Camden occurred on August 16, 1780.
Stephen Cordill:
First Tour:  (p.3), “… that he entered the service of the United States shortly before Gen’l Gates defeat at Camden SC as a volunteer for three months in Wilkes County North Carolina where he lived in Capt. John Morgan’s Company”.  He was discharged, “… at the mouth of Rocky River in Wilkes County N.C. by Col. Noah…”.  Mathematically, his three month enlistment ended in mid-November 1780.
Second Tour: (p.3), “… sometime before the Battle of King’s Mountain he again volunteered for three months …”.  The Battle of King’s Mountain occurred October 7, 1780.  Seemingly, his enlistments overlap or they were perhaps back-to-back. Mathematically, his second tour of three month enlistment ended sometime around the end of December 1780.
Third Tour: (p.4), “Next in 1781 in Wilks County N.C. where he resided he volunteered for three months in Capt. Johnson’s Company in the 5th Reg’t. …”
(p.5), “He was born in Lunenburg County Va”.
(p.5), Stephen Cordill … is the brother of the above James Cordill …”.
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:

MAPS & DOCUMENTS:
Pension Application Images: Twenty-five pages total. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25.
By calculation, Stephen entered at seventeen years of age and was eighteen when discharged from his third tour.


RECORD 1780-E

October 16, 1780

The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration. Nathaniel Laffoon Pension Application, File S-8813.
Nathaniel Laffoon, resident of Lunenburg Co., VA, drafted into the military and attached to the Regiment under Col. John Glenn of Lunenburg.
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
(1) Nathaniel states, “He was born in Brunswick Virginia — his parents moved while he was very young to Lunenburg.”  Stephen Caudle lived in Brunswick then Lunenburg as well.  Nathaniel Laffoon, Matthew Laffoon and Stephen Caudle received land next to one another in 1759. The first trace of Nathaniel in proximity to the Caudle’s occurs in 1753 in Brunswick Co., six years before the 1759 transaction.
DOCUMENT:


RECORD 1781-A

August 1781

Amelia County Marriage Bonds – Volume 16, No. 4; p. 279. August, 1781.
Purkinson, John Cordle & Elizb. Bevill.
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


RECORD 1781-B

August 27, 1781

Library of Virginia – Brunswick County, VA.  Guardians’ Accounts, 1780 – 1808, See Deed Book No. 4 (REEL #3), pp. 1-19.
(p.1), August 27, 1781: Marcum Hardaway, Sally Hardaway, Nancy Hardaway, orphans; entrusted to the Guardianship of William Caudle;
(p.3), September 24, 1781:  Stephen Morgan, orphan; entrusted to the Guardianship of James Quarles;
(pp.4-6), October 22, 1781:  John Caudle, Susanna Caudle, Charles Caudle, orphans; entrusted to the care of Thomas Morris;
(p.8), August 26, 1782:  Sally Hardaway and Nancy Hardaway, orphans of John Hardaway; entrusted to the Guardianship of William Caudle;
(pp. 12-13), October 28, 1782:  Rebecca Hardaway, Hartwell Hardaway, orphans; entrusted to the Guardianship of Mary Hardaway;
(p.17), August 24, 1783:  Account of Mary Wright, for the boarding of Stephen Morgan, orphan; entrusted to the Guardianship of James Quarles;
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
(1) “When an individual acts as a trustee for another, the relationship is described as a fiduciary one. The protection of inherited property (both real and personal) was an important reason for the creation of court records. When minor children survived a parent, a guardian was often appointed to protect the estate for the children.  Appointments of guardians are recorded in the county court order books.  In the index, the guardian appointments may be listed in the name of the orphan, the name of the guardian, or under the general category “orphans.”
A guardian was appointed by the court only if there was an estate to protect. At age thirteen, a child was eligible to go into court and choose his own guardian. Poor orphaned children did not have guardians and were bound out to learn a trade. In the colonial period, this was handled by the vestry of each Anglican parish. After disestablishment, the orphans were bound out by the overseers of the poor for the county. Records of apprenticeship are found in the county court order books.
Periodically guardians were required to bring estate accounts into court.  These were often recorded in volumes known as guardians accounts. The estate of a deceased person with minor children required the keeping of records (estate or fiduciary) until it was settled. This occurred when the last minor child married or arrived at legal age. Records of this sort are found in will books, estate account books, and fiduciary or audit books.”
DOCUMENT:
Library of Virginia. http://www.lva.virginia.gov/public/guides/rn6_localrecs.htm.


RECORD 1782-A

May 14, 1782

Susanna Cordle married Burwell Bassett Wilkes, I as his first wife on 14 May 1782 in Brunswick Co., Virginia. Joseph Wilkes was a witness, and William Cordle, father of Susanna, was Surety. Their only child, Susanna Cordle Wilkes, married Phillip Prior on 5 July 1802 in Brunswick Co., Virginia. Their son, Samuel Prior was provided for in the will of Burwell Bassett Wilkes, I.
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


RECORD 1782-B

September 4, 1782

LOV – Lunenburg County, VA: Deed Book, 13, 1777 – 1784, Unpaged index, 585 p., p. 484.
NATHANIEL LAFFOON to John Laffoon, 200 lbs, 50 acres, Branch of Great Creek bounded by NATHANIEL LAFFOON JR.
NARRATIVE:
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DOCUMENT:


RECORD 1782-C

September 10, 1782

(LOV ~ REEL #5) LOV – Lunenburg County, VA: Deed Book, 12, 1771 – 1777, Unpaged index, 542 p., p. 483.
Nathaniel Laffoon Sr. to Nathaniel Laffoon Jr., 80 lbs, 80 acres, land in fork of Great Creek adjoining John Maden (Mayton) and James Thompson.
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


RECORD 1783-A

1783

Lunenburg Co., VA. Cumberland Parish Vestry 1783 Tax List, by Charles Hamlin, gent.
Nathaniel Laffoon, (1 tithe, 2 white souls, 1 black > at least age 21); John Laffoon, (1 tithe, 2 white souls > at least age 21); Nathaniel Laffoon, Sr., (1 tithe, 5 white souls).
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


September 3, 1783

PEACE TREATY SIGNED ENDING AMERICAN REVOLUTION.


RECORD 1783-B

August 20, 1783

Grant 403 acres James Parish CGB C:529.  Column Note This Grant was altered in the Name of Governour Harrison and dated 20th August 1783 because the Grant was made out and recorded before Signed by Governour Jefferson who resigned before it could be signed or Seald to James Parish, assignee of William Samford
Con A.C. of £2 Sterling paid by James Parish into the Treasury of this Commonwealth 403acs. by Survey bearing date the 28th day of November 1754 re 403a Lunenburg/ on the Branches of the Great Creek loc 61092 – 64158 F127 L0 P255 pt A) Stephen Candles [sic Caudles] upper Corner !a Gum on a small branch at A from A to B lm ; ; down a small br. pt B) pine on the same B. to C. ln E; 104P; pt C) Great pine C. to D ln N8E; 149P; pt D) pine D. to E. ln N60W; 94P; pt E) white Oak E. to F. ln N78W; 160P; pt F) Turky Oak F. to G. ln S60W; 192P; pt G) pointers G. to H. ln S38E; 152P; pt H) Stephen Candles Corner white Oak on great Creek !H. to A. along his Line N76E 164P to the beginning ln n76e; 164p; from Stephen Candle/Caudle on Great Creek. end
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


RECORD 1783-C

December 22, 1783

Sarah Hardaway married Francis Stainback in Brunswick Co. December 22, 1783.  William Caudle was surety.
NARRATIVE:
RESEARCH NOTE:
DOCUMENT:


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References   [ + ]

1. Bassett, John S. The Regulators of North Carolina (1765-1771), p.150
2. Ibid. p.141
3. Ibid. p.142
4. Ibid. p.144
5, 6. Ibid. p.145
7. Ibid. p.146
8. Ibid. p.147
9. Ibid. p.148
10. Ibid. p.149
11. Ibid. p.150
12. Ibid. p.152
13. Ibid. p.153